posted by Charleyy Hodson

Will video theft ever end?!

Back in January, Casey Neistat uploaded a video called Snowboarding with the NYPD which immediately went viral and to this day as nearly 13 million views. But, in the 36 hours following its release, why did Casey and an assistant spend 36 hours combing through Facebook and YouTube? His video had immediately been freebooted.

Freebooting, in Casey’s words to CMO Today, is the situation when “people steal other people’s content and then re-upload it”, often without sourcing the original creator. In his eyes, when Facebook announced that they receive around 8 billion video views daily on their social media platform, the way they fuelled that growth was a “little underhanded and dirty” based on the fact they are the worst site for letting freebooters get away with video theft.

Freebooting isn’t brand new to the Internet unfortunately, with prolific ‘Booters such as SoFloAntonio doing it on a regular basis. In Casey Neistat’s situation however, his snowboarding video had been freebooted nearly 200 times on Facebook and 4 times on YouTube in only a day- but he can’t be online 24/7 policing the entirety of the web for Freebooters.

Whilst Facebook announced back in August 2015 that they were testing out some new software that would prevent unauthorised/freebooted videos from being uploaded to the platform, the damage has already been done. To offer a comparison, Casey talks about the freebooting response that YouTube has in place, saying that it’s probably the greatest offence you can commit on YouTube and they will throw you off the platform and delete your entire channel for doing that”.

Hopefully one day you won’t be able to watch the video below because it will have been finally reported and removed from the Internet, but until then it stands as the perfect example of Casey’s freebooted video right on YouTube itself.