posted by Benedict Townsend

The FCC is looking to drastically alter the rules on ‘net neutrality’ – a concept that keeps the internet free and open. This affects us all.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), an independent US government body, will deliver some proposals by the 17th of July which aim, ultimately, to dent net neutrality. In the eyes of many major websites and internet creators, this is a very bad thing. Here are just some of the organisations that have spoken out against the move:

net neutrality


What is ‘net neutrality’?

‘Net neutrality’ is a concept you may have heard of, but may not know much about. That’s totally understandable: Net neutrality is one of those issues (like climate change) that is both incredibly important, but also very dense and often, pretty boring to read about. Net neutrality refers to the basic right for internet users to have access to websites equally. Net neutrality says that internet providers cannot favour certain websites over others, for example, by having certain websites load faster than others (yes, really). It also means that companies cannot charge you a fee to access certain popular websites (like YouTube). Put simply: net neutrality forbids internet providers from discriminating when they offer a service.

some more opponent of the move


Do Internet providers like net neutrality?

No. Neither does the FCC, it seems.


Why?

Money. Moolah. Cheese. Stacks. Bills. Net neutrality stands in the way of whole new revenue streams for internet providers and they don’t like it. There’s a reason why websites tend to hate the idea of net neutrality being dented – because they would not benefit at all, only the providers would.

 


Who is against this move?

A whole lot of companies and organisations. There is already a huge international movement to oppose the changes, which could very well have a ripple effect on internet freedoms around the world. A ‘Day Of Action’ is being held on July 12th and you can find out all the information you need about it right here.

net neutrality