PewDiePie opens up about overcoming a drinking problem in new podcast

23 July 2019, 14:22

PewDiePie
PewDiePie. Picture: YouTube: @pewdiepie
Staff

By Staff

"I realised how hard it is to stop that habit. It was really scary."

PewDiePie may be more well known for his comedy on his YouTube channel, but the YouTuber recently opened up about his past issues with alcohol in a new podcast.

Appearing on the Cold Ones podcast, hosted by Anything4Views and Maxmoefoe!, PewDiePIe spoke about how he previously had issues with drinking but has since managed to gain some “self-control”.

PewDiePie - real name Felix Kjellberg - opened up about his past issues when he was asked about a lyric in his song ‘Congratulations’, which he released when T-Series passed him in subscriber count earlier this year. The song, which is a sarcastic jab at the rival YouTube channel, contains the lyric: “Just there to pop bottles with my nine-year-old army, non-alcoholic cause I had a real problem”.

“I started drinking whiskey because I was always working constantly. I never felt like I had a period where I could chill or relax at the end of the day,” he said, explaining how he formed unhealthy drinking habits without noticing at first.

“I read this book on Buddhism, and it talked about self-control, and being in control of your body. And not always just doing what your craving wants you to do. I never thought about self control before, and how that changes your mentality,” he added, saying he now has more healthy outlets for stress, including exercise and gardening.

“I used to have this habit of drinking whisky, a little bit, and then I realised how fucking hard it is to stop that habit. It was really scary. I was like ‘fuck’! And then I stopped drinking for half a year.”

It’s not the first time PewDiePie has spoken about how the pressures of being a YouTuber have affected him. In a video posted to his channel last month - where he revealed how much he earns per month - he spoke about how the public being able to see how successful he is at his job via subscriber counts can be.

“Imagine you have a job and how well you are performing in that job is 100% public and 100% comparable to all your peers,” he explained. “Like there’s some deep psychological emotional stress that’s always lingering for a lot of YouTubers. Like eventually, it just hit me, I don’t care… like I don’t care how many subscribers I have.”